Speech Therapy Services

Hearing, Speech & Deaf Center’s Speech department works with community members of all ages who experience a variety of communication challenges.  Our goal is to remove communication barriers by offering services tailored to meet your needs.

We are pleased to announce an exciting addition to the services available at our HSDC Tacoma location. On June 4th, HSDC Tacoma began offering Speech-language services on Thursdays from 8:00am-6:00pm. Care is provided by Deanna DeBye MS, CCC-SLP, who is our Director of Speech Services and a Speech-Language Pathologist. She will be providing assessment and ongoing treatment for individuals of all ages.

Below are descriptions of types of speech disorders and treatments affecting children and adults, and explanations of how focused speech therapy with HSDC staff can help.

If you’d like to discuss what therapy options may be right for you or your child, please contact us at 206.388.1300 or speechadmin@hsdc.org.

Children

  • Articulation and Phonological Disorders may impact a child’s ability to produce speech sounds. Therapy may improve these productions and help children to be more easily understood.
  • Childhood Apraxia of Speech is a motor speech disorder that may cause a child to have difficulty producing sounds, syllables, words, or sentences.  Therapy focuses on motor planning and sound sequencing in order to improve overall intelligibility.
  • Voice and Resonance Disorders may cause roughness, breathiness, strain, or other qualities in the voice. Therapy is specific to the voice disorder and may improve vocal quality and voicing efficiency.
  • Fluency Disorders (Stuttering) are characterized by repetitions, prolongations, hesitations, and other behaviors that interfere with the smooth flow of speech. Therapy focuses on reducing or modifying these dysfluencies and promoting more fluent speech.
  • Language Delays and Disorders may impact a child’s ability to understand or use language. Therapy may improve how children understand others (comprehension) and/or express themselves (expression).
  • Literacy and Other Language-Based Learning Disabilities may impact a child’s ability to read and write. The purpose of therapy is to improve literacy and promote learning.
  • Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) involves the use of high-tech and/or low-tech tools to improve communication in children with a variety of disorders. Examples include language boards and iPad applications.
  • Auditory Processing Disorder (APD) is diagnosed by a multidisciplinary team including a speech-language pathologist and an audiologist. APD may impact a child’s ability to understand speech in noisy environments, follow directions, or tell the difference between similar-sounding speech sounds. Therapy may improve how children respond to complex auditory information. 

Adults

  • Accent Modification intervention is for individuals who wish to reduce an accent or learn a new accent for cultural, professional, or personal reasons.  
  • Aphasia is a language disorder resulting from damage to the part of the brain where language is processed and produced. Therapy is specific to the needs of the individual and may focus on improving speaking, listening, reading, or writing.
  • Fluency Disorders (Stuttering) are characterized by repetitions, prolongations, hesitations, and other behaviors that interfere with the smooth flow of speech. Therapy focuses on reducing or modifying these dysfluencies and promoting more fluent speech.
  • Voice Disorders may cause roughness, breathiness, strain, or other qualities in the voice. Therapy is specific to the disorder and may improve vocal quality and voicing efficiency.
  • Literacy refers to an individual’s ability to read and write. Difficulty with literacy may be due to a variety of causes and may result in difficulty with work or school.  The purpose of therapy is to improve reading and writing in a way that functional and meaningful to the individual.